Launch Event of the LAFIYA HIV Self-Testing Study in Ghana

Launch Event of the LAFIYA HIV Self-Testing Study in Ghana

In the heart of Ghana's slums, young sexual minority men (YSMM) face formidable barriers—societal stigma, discrimination, and limited access to healthcare—hindering their access to crucial HIV and sexual health services. Understanding these barriers, researchers from the University of Rochester School of Nursing and the Behavioral, Sexual & Global Health Lab, in collaboration with the University of Ghana School of Public Health, have embarked on a study:

REFUGEE INITIATIVE FOR ENHANCING SEXUAL HEALTH - RIFESH

REFUGEE INITIATIVE FOR ENHANCING SEXUAL HEALTH - RIFESH

There is an unavailability of comprehensive information in Western Europe on HIV prevalence among Sub-Saharan African immigrants, especially among male and female sex workers. SSA immigrants, men who have sex with men, people who use drugs, and sex workers experience a disproportionate burden of HIV compared to other persons. Thus mirroring reported burdens among the same populations in SSA.

NIH FOGARTY-FUNDED STUDY SEEKS TO BOOST HIV SELF-TESTING, REDUCE STIGMA FOR MEN IN GHANA

NIH FOGARTY-FUNDED STUDY SEEKS TO BOOST HIV SELF-TESTING, REDUCE STIGMA FOR MEN IN GHANA

For young men living in Ghana's cities, barriers such as societal stigma, discrimination and limited access to health care can make it difficult to seek HIV and sexual health services. Researchers from the University of Rochester School of Nursing and the Behavioral, Sexual & Global Health Lab are pioneering a group intervention to improve health outcomes among those who are most disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic in Ghana.

ADDRESSING HIV PREVALENCE AMONG MSM IN SLUM COMMUNITIES: THE LAFIYA HIVST INTERVENTION.

ADDRESSING HIV PREVALENCE AMONG MSM IN SLUM COMMUNITIES: THE LAFIYA HIVST INTERVENTION.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) remains a significant global health concern, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM) populations. In many countries, including Ghana, MSM faces unique challenges and barriers to accessing HIV testing and support services. Among young MSM living in slum communities, these obstacles can be even more pronounced. However, there is hope in the form of the LAFIYA HIVST intervention, which aims to address HIV prevalence and promote unassisted HIV self-testing(HIVST) methods among young GBMSM living in slum areas of Ghana.